need help with very scared monitor

Helping Pet Lovers Since 1999 Forums Lizard Forums need help with very scared monitor

This topic contains 8 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  WingedWolfPsion 5 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #74540

    casperbunny
    Participant

    hi
    my son got a monitor lizard he is very nervus and very agressive
    not sure of his age does any one know what we can do to calm him down
    when ever my son is in the room chucky[the monitors name]will cower away into his hide,if he tries to pick him up he will whip and bite and spray
    we had the camera on him when not in the room and hes fine eating and strutting about but he dont like humans
    any advice would be greatly appreciated
    thank you

    #665485

    ryebread86
    Participant

    What type of monitor is he?

    #665486

    WingedWolfPsion
    Participant

    This is very normal behavior for a baby monitor of any species. Once he’s been in your home for a few months, and is healthy and eating well, I recommend moving his enclosure into a high traffic area of the home, where he will see humans quite frequently. Don’t handle him. Take care to ensure that he continues eating well, and give him at least another month or so in this environment. By the end of that time, he should be used to seeing humans on a regular basis. The next step is to use tongs to hand-feed him.
    As he gets more used to this, you can try to lure him onto your hands.

    Only then should you begin working with him by picking him up. Approach him from the side, not from above–being grabbed from above reminds reptiles of being grabbed by a predator, and is very frightening. Scoop him up using slow to moderate speed–not too slow, and without any hesitation. Hesitation will just give him a chance to get worked up and start reacting.

    Don’t expect him to tame down entirely, really, until he is a year old. Baby reptiles are nervous, and gain confidence as they gain size.

    Of course, the species of monitor certainly does make a difference, as does the individual temperament of your pet. He may wind up being as placid as a bearded dragon, or he might always be willing to bite, scratch, and tail-whip. You will have to be prepared to meet his needs, either way; whether he becomes a pet that can be handled, or a strictly hands-off display animal. A monitor lizard certainly isn’t the best choice for a first reptile pet, but they are highly intelligent, curious, and interesting.

    Take special care to meet all of his husbandry needs–monitors aren’t as forgiving of mistakes as, say, a leopard gecko. Most species get fairly large, and they’re also very active, so they need a very large enclosure. Buy a book on monitor care, and read up on care sheets for the species of monitor that you have. You can also find good advice on reptile forums, and instructions for things like building a Retes stack (a construction of boards that provides monitors with a hiding place and basking area).

    #665482

    casperbunny
    Participant

    he is a boss monitor

    #665487

    WingedWolfPsion
    Participant

    Bosc’s Monitor is also known as the Savannah Monitor in the US, so that should help with finding care sheets.
    Varanus exanthematicus

    This is one of the better ‘starter’ monitors, and most of them will tame down well if handled properly and regularly. They are a heavy-bodied monitor. Care should be taken to avoid obesity, as this species will just eat and eat, lol.

    #665488

    WingedWolfPsion
    Participant

    Bosc’s, aka Savannah Monitor

    #665484

    MokeyBird
    Participant

    Ah, had to look that one up. They are known as Savannah monitors here.

    Ignore the bad behavior. If he bites, whips, hisses, or bluffs, just go about it like it is not happening. Monitors are THE most intelligent lizards, and learn very quick that “If I bite, human leaves me alone.” “If I whip my tail, human leaves me alone.” “If I hiss and puff myself up and bluff and look scary, human leaves me alone.

    #665489

    WingedWolfPsion
    Participant

    I’m not sure I really agree with that method. While monitors are intelligent, they still aren’t mammals or birds. If a reptile is upset, and you continue to harrass it, it is likely to get more upset and defensive. You’re also allowing it to ‘practice’ its defensive behavior. In general, you should back off on working with a reptile once it begins to get truly upset, and avoid its getting defensive in the first place. That way its aggressive reactions won’t be reinforced.

    #665483

    casperbunny
    Participant

    thank you
    thats what we doing and he seems to be getting better
    still has hissy fit now and again but we getting there
    thanks again


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