Orphaned Meadow Vole…Help!

PetsHub.com Forums Mouse Forums Orphaned Meadow Vole…Help!

This topic contains 25 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by  mitch 1 year, 7 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 26 total)
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  • #61475

    Lou2
    Participant

    The farmers next door mowed their hay yesterday. My son came in with an orphaned meadow vole (meadow mouse) after following the cries of the poor little guy. We read up on them via the net and found that their usual lifespan is 4.5 months unless they are kept in captivity. In that case, they can live for up to 3 years. We have been feeding him (drops at a time on our fingertips) warmed half and half. He seems to have perked up from his dehydrated state yesterday. My little boy even got up at 4am to feed him. (I’m so proud of him!). He has nibbled on some homemade pancake. He obviously wasn’t weaned. He seems to have that will to live and loves to be held in a “fist”. Anyone with any helpful hints as to how to get this little guy grown? Anyone ever raised a tiny vole? Had any successes?

    New to this,
    Lou2

    #554693

    babeEgrl10
    Participant

    i’m not sure…. i’m having probs too.

    #554688

    Jimmyness
    Participant

    Im sorry im not too sure but apparently cats milk is whats best for feeding baby mice so give that a go. Soak it in some bread so then the mouse can suck on the bread to get the milk. Good luck!!! And your son sounds like such a great kid:D

    #554679

    Jennicat
    Participant

    Try to find a wildlife rehabilitator that can get him well and back out into the wild. His lifespan may be 3 years in captivity, but if you don’t have any idea what he should be eating, it’s going to be less than a week.

    #554694

    babeEgrl10
    Participant

    on their own the only live to be usually 3 months of age. its really sad and i would save more.

    #554700

    Lou2
    Participant

    “Victor” seems to be doing well. He loves half and half! He nibbles on soft things such as pancakes and cheerios. Somtimes we dip things in milk or water to make them easier for him to chew. He is so spoiled that he squeaks when we put him back into his coffee can. I tried giving him some flaxseed, but his little teeth just can’t handle them yet. My son named him Victor because he fought the odds and came out victorious (so far!).

    Thanks everyone!
    Lou

    #554680

    Jennicat
    Participant

    Again, I encourage you to find a wildlife rehabilitator. I know it’s cute and fun and all of that to have a vole in your house, but it’s also illegal to keep wild animals as pets, and you don’t have any idea what he eats. I’m going to have to go out on a limb and say that wild voles don’t eat pancakes and cheerios.

    #554695

    babeEgrl10
    Participant

    give it a chance. would you rather it live? or die in a mouse trap in someones house? huh? she needs help, so please help her. I’m only turning on you because i know she is doing fine and helping the poor little creature.

    #554681

    Jennicat
    Participant

    The road to hell is paved with good intentions, as they say.

    You’re not “turning on me”, you’re displaying an insane amount of ignorance about the laws regarding keeping wild animals, as well as parasites that wild animals carry which may infect humans.

    #554683

    hitbystars
    Participant
    babeEgrl10 wrote:
    on their own the only live to be usually 3 months of age. its really sad and i would save more.

    You wouldn’t save, you would take in & breed them out…. you’ve shown your breeding iggnorance multiple times here before (and now your dog killed those babies???? hate to say it, but they’re in a better place now.)

    #554696

    babeEgrl10
    Participant

    i dont breed. if they are lucky they may find a good home. but most dont. and she is on the right track. so dont make comments to me. make them to her.

    #554684

    hitbystars
    Participant

    You’ve made topics talking about wanting to breed/your baby mice…. correct?

    #554699

    KK76
    Participant

    Aren’t you all getting off subject? I think the advice about care and the advice about finding wildlife caretakers is both good — why are we making this personal?? I thought these boards were simply to give help when and where we could. I don’t think anyone’s advice is better than anyone else’s. We should let the person with the question decide who’s advice they want to follow. Let’s add to each other’s knowledge not subtract from it…what good has that ever done anyway?? If you want to criticize someone, criticize me — I have no information to add to this topic and your criticism will therefore not hurt anything.

    #554697

    LittleHippyGirl
    Participant

    I agree kk76. I’m new to this forum and I’ve seen a lot of personal attacks that haven’t been necessary. Yes, some people do deserve it, but its not necessary to bombard some one with accusing questions or criticize them for trying to learn what’s best when they’ve started off on the wrong foot.

    Sorry this has gotten so off topic. Anyways, I’m in the middle of the two views. I think that you should call a wildlife rescue and at least find out the proper care and feeding for him if you still want to care for him on your own. Just calling for information can’t hurt, right?

    #554701

    Lou2
    Participant

    First off, I never meant to raise such a stir. I found Pets Hub while doing internet research on voles. I figured this would be a good place to get advice, not bashing.

    Secondly, pancakes and cherrios are wheat and nut products. What do mice, rats, voles, squirrrels, RODENTIA eat in the wild? Half and half is full of fat. I knew that would be a much better choice than the skim milk that we drink. His mother’s milk would have been good and fatty…just right for him, but since his mother met her demise with a thrasher, we came up with another (apparently good) substitue. Victor’s teeth have strengthened, thanks to the nibbling away on cherrios, so that he now is eating flaxseeds. As he grows he will continue to graduate up to appropriate foods-sunflower seeds, corn,nuts, etc. He is growing, loves attention, and if he continues to do well, will be a permanent part of our family (along with the “pet store mouse”, five box turtles, one yellow cooter turtle,one Uromastix lizard, two dogs, two hens, and a rooster). And that’s not counting dear son’s four sisters, and one father (my dear husband). Yes, we live in the country and everything has plenty to eat and plenty of roaming room to go with their great care and lots of attention. 😀

    Thirdly, my son is a naturalist. He has not the least bit of his dad’s hunter gene. He is also a tender-hearted naturalist who would not listen to an abandoned baby creature and just walk away. This same small-framed boy, unbeknownst to me, tackled a 6 1/2 foot black snake single-handedly on Easter Sunday…to rescue the bird it had just tried to eat…he also heard the bird’s cries for help. The bird flew away,the snake slithered off. And don’t even start on the food chain thing. I’m almost certain that the snake did not go to bed hungry…:eek:

    He learned how to catch snakes from The Crocodile Hunter. If I’m not mistaken, there’s a quote made by the late Steve Irvin about touching people’s lives toward wildlife on the top of Pets Hub pages. Is it on your page, as well?:cool:

    OK. I’m finished with my book. I probably will not be back, so you needn’t send me a nasty reply. (And I won’t tell you about the chocolate cake-which contains flour, which is part of the grain family :p ).

    Lovingly,
    Lou2 (and Victor,too)

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